Bitdefender: antivirus software that isn’t a resource hog

If ever there was software that became overly bloated it’s antivirus software offerings. Some would say that they make your PC secure because it becomes so unusable you’d never be able to download a virus! But Bitdefender is different.

OK, so apart from Windows Defender, most antivirus software offerings do the basics quite well – they contain comprehensive virus definition databases that get updated quickly. The reason we like Bitdefender is that it doesn’t slow your machine down much or annoy you with silly popups.

Once downloaded Bitdefender will sit quietly in the background, all you have is an icon in your system tray. There’s not a glaring pop up trying to sell you an upgrade or scaring you with stories of fear; just an icon. It will monitor your activity in the background and keep a check on things for you.

If you wish to do an intensive, full system scan then you can. Even when this is running, Bitdefender just shows a small activity picture in the lower right hand corner of your screen.

It works too, from running the full scan on our test PC Bitdefender picked up two Trojans that Windows Defender had missed, which Bitdefender successfully quarantined.

You can pick up free or paid for versions (see here) and you can get Bitdefender to run for free on your Android phone too (see here).

Speed up your Windows PC, Mac or Phone with Ccleaner

Cleaning up your PC can give you more storage space back, and give you a speed boost as your computer is not bogged down processing unnecessary files or instructions.

Actually cleaning up this space is rather more challenging though. You need to first of all figure out where the files are that can be removed (without damaging anything in the process) and then you have to actually delete them which is rather tedious.

Enter Ccleaner an application for PC, Mac & Phones with both free and paid for versions (see here for more details). Once you’ve downloaded and installed Ccleaner it will safely clean up space by removing unnecessary files left on your disk by Windows (or OSX) and applications that you’ve installed, on top of this on Windows PCs it will analyse your registry to pick up problems (such as dangling references to dlls, etc) that could be slowing down your machine.

When cleaning files you get a nice interface which allows you to select which files to look at – if there are some applications that you don’t want Ccleaner to touch (we left Chrome alone for example) then you can untick this. The application first analyses what can be done – our analysis found roughly 23gb of space that could be restored – if you are happy to go ahead then the application will remove these files. Note, it permentanly removes the files! No going back.

Speed up your PC

On the registry side of things a similar process is followed. Ccleaner will first analyse your registry for problems. However, given the sensitivity of the registry and the potential for damage, it gives you the option to backup the registry to file first. We strongly recommend doing this. As it happens, there were no problems when we ran Ccleaner on our registry.

Speed up your PC

Ccleaner doesn’t just work on a Windows PC, it will run on your Mac and your Android smartphone too.

Ccleaner is highly recommended and comes in free and paid for versions (see here for more details).

Beginner’s Guide to InfoSec: Peerlyst’s First E-Book on Amazon

The “Beginner’s Guide to Information Security,” crowdsourced from members of the Peerlyst InfoSec community, is now available on Amazon.

The Beginner’s Guide to Information Security offers insight and resources to help readers embark on a career in one of the 21st century’s most important—and potentially lucrative—fields. But even as the world comes to recognize how essential InfoSec is, it’s still a relatively new discipline, and the paths leading into it are many—and not always well defined. The first e-book from Peerlyst (https://www.peerlyst.com), the Beginner’s Guide to Information Security aims to cut through some of the confusion about how and where to start, putting readers on the road to a successful career in the field.

The guide’s content has been crowdsourced from members of the Peerlyst online community of InfoSec professionals. Many are longtime experts in some of the sectors that make up this varied field, others are relative newcomers eager to share the advice and resources they’ve found most valuable during their own career journeys. The contributors include Cheryl Biswas, a cybersecurity consultant focused on threat Intel with KPMG; Kris Rides, who heads an information security recruitment agency; and network security specialist Dean Webb.

Click here for a direct link to the book.



“The Beginner’s Guide to Information Security aligns perfectly with the mission of Peerlyst.com, which is removing information and knowledge barriers so security professionals can work together and educate each other,” says Limor Elbaz, Peerlyst’s founder and CEO. “And if advice from experts helps more newbies get involved in InfoSec, that will ease the pressure on those who are currently in the field—without compromising on the quality of education.”

The Beginner’s Guide to Information Security begins with some chapters that cover ways readers can learn about information security, maybe pick up a certification or two, find out about job opportunities, and then, hopefully, snag a job. Then it delves deeper into the InfoSec field, offering perspective and resources that will help readers master key skills, like knowing how to protect a network, respond to a security incident, and educate users so they’re part of the security solution—not the problem. The last chapters focus on “big picture” issues such as women in security, and where InfoSec may be heading in the future.

The book’s chapters include:

  • Thirteen Steps for Starting Your InfoSec Journey
  • Starting a Career in Network Security
  • How to Prepare for an InfoSec Interview
  • Working with Recruiters
  • How to Get Started in Cryptography
  • How to Secure Your Data
  • Basic Network Security
  • Security Awareness: The “People Part” of Information Systems
  • How to Respond to a Security Incident
  • Women in Security
  • The Defender’s Changing Role

To check out the book on Amazon, go here: http://amzn.to/2aYXfMx. To request a free copy for review, contact us at press@peerlyst.com.

About Peerlyst

Peerlyst is the place where information security pros go to share knowledge and build their professional reputations. With an audience of more than half a million and more than 10,000 posts by security experts, Peerlyst is the preeminent platform for spreading InfoSec news, asking a question, finding an expert, or offering product insight. For more information, emailinfo@peerlyst.com or visit https://www.peerlyst.com.

Media contact:

Mike Stabile
718-501-5181

SOURCE Peerlyst & http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/beginners-guide-to-infosec-peerlysts-first-e-book-on-amazon-300311014.html

Related Links

https://www.peerlyst.com

Zoostorm Home Desktop PC User Review

Zoostorm is a British PC manufacturer that those looking for a well built desktop PC at a good price should look towards.

The model we’re reviewing has an Intel Core-i5 processor, 8GB of RAM, 1tb hard drive and Windows 10 Home pre installed. All this comes in at just £394.93 with free delivery from Amazon. However, Zoostorm have a wide and comprehensive range of PCs available so there will be other models to suit your requirements.  Amazon has the same spec PC listed, albeit with a slightly different case:

The first thing you notice is that the computer is big, physically. It is not in a slimline or sleek case, it is a good old fashioned tower case. This means it’s more likely going to sit under your desk rather than on it. Computer enthusiasts will like this as you can easily open the case to access all the components but space conscious users may be concerned by this.

The performance for a home PC is good. We’ve used the PC for email, web browsing, editing word documents, photos and video management, and some remote access to work computers. This isn’t a gaming powerhouse, but the price reflects this.

The model we tested didn’t come with wifi. This means that we hooked it up by plugging a network cable into a powerline network (that is a wired network that runs over you home electrical system). We found this to be too slow and eventually installed a wifi card. Installation was easy as the case is so big, and the performance of the card was good. We used the following wifi card:

TP-LINK TL-WDN4800 N900 Wireless Dual Band PCI Express Adapter

The PC doesn’t come with any speakers, so you’ll need some headphones or a set of cheap pc speakers. You’ve probably got some kicking about the house/office.

Build quality wise the tower case is well built and sturdy. There are no corners cut here and the computer feels like a premium product. The computer is supplied with a keyboard and mouse, which are perfectly usable although the mouse in particular has a somewhat budget feel. Again, consider the price though and this becomes more acceptable.

In summary, if you are looking for a slim, small PC this isn’t for you; if you are looking for a powerhouse PC this isn’t for you; however if you are looking for a great value PC with good performance (which can be easily modified and upgraded) then you really should consider a Zoostorm PC.