Protect your email from viruses with Virus Eraser (Mac & Windows)

Viruses can take down both Macs and PCs.  They can be downloaded from the web and sent by email.  Sometimes this is by nefarious people, but sometimes it’s unintentionally by friends and work colleagues.

Virus Eraser is a new antivirus product that works on all versions of Windows and on Macs too.  On top of the real-time protection and massive database of viruses, it also stops you being that person distributing the viruses unintentionally (and, of course, scans your incoming mail to protect you too).

Virus Eraser is said to scan your mail and attachments, and work with all mail clients on a Mac.

We’ve not had a chance to put the software through its paces yet, but the company is an Intel Software Product Partner, which gives them some good credibility.

Check them out here Virus Eraser

Bitdefender: antivirus software that isn’t a resource hog

If ever there was software that became overly bloated it’s antivirus software offerings. Some would say that they make your PC secure because it becomes so unusable you’d never be able to download a virus! But Bitdefender is different.

OK, so apart from Windows Defender, most antivirus software offerings do the basics quite well – they contain comprehensive virus definition databases that get updated quickly. The reason we like Bitdefender is that it doesn’t slow your machine down much or annoy you with silly popups.

Once downloaded Bitdefender will sit quietly in the background, all you have is an icon in your system tray. There’s not a glaring pop up trying to sell you an upgrade or scaring you with stories of fear; just an icon. It will monitor your activity in the background and keep a check on things for you.

If you wish to do an intensive, full system scan then you can. Even when this is running, Bitdefender just shows a small activity picture in the lower right hand corner of your screen.

It works too, from running the full scan on our test PC Bitdefender picked up two Trojans that Windows Defender had missed, which Bitdefender successfully quarantined.

You can pick up free or paid for versions (see here) and you can get Bitdefender to run for free on your Android phone too (see here).

Speed up your Windows PC, Mac or Phone with Ccleaner

Cleaning up your PC can give you more storage space back, and give you a speed boost as your computer is not bogged down processing unnecessary files or instructions.

Actually cleaning up this space is rather more challenging though. You need to first of all figure out where the files are that can be removed (without damaging anything in the process) and then you have to actually delete them which is rather tedious.

Enter Ccleaner an application for PC, Mac & Phones with both free and paid for versions (see here for more details). Once you’ve downloaded and installed Ccleaner it will safely clean up space by removing unnecessary files left on your disk by Windows (or OSX) and applications that you’ve installed, on top of this on Windows PCs it will analyse your registry to pick up problems (such as dangling references to dlls, etc) that could be slowing down your machine.

When cleaning files you get a nice interface which allows you to select which files to look at – if there are some applications that you don’t want Ccleaner to touch (we left Chrome alone for example) then you can untick this. The application first analyses what can be done – our analysis found roughly 23gb of space that could be restored – if you are happy to go ahead then the application will remove these files. Note, it permentanly removes the files! No going back.

Speed up your PC

On the registry side of things a similar process is followed. Ccleaner will first analyse your registry for problems. However, given the sensitivity of the registry and the potential for damage, it gives you the option to backup the registry to file first. We strongly recommend doing this. As it happens, there were no problems when we ran Ccleaner on our registry.

Speed up your PC

Ccleaner doesn’t just work on a Windows PC, it will run on your Mac and your Android smartphone too.

Ccleaner is highly recommended and comes in free and paid for versions (see here for more details).

Nope 2.0 means you can stop sticking tape over your webcam

Even though I am (or perhaps, because I am) a technologist I still stick a bit of tape over the webcam on my laptop.  It’s not just that I think I may get hacked, it’s because I think I may be using some conference calling software incorrectly and my face will suddenly be broadcast to some corporate meeting.

And I’m not alone in my solution, I see co-workers regularly sticking tape on their computers, or slotting a business card in there.  Even Mark Zuckerberg does.

So, this is why Note 2.0 caught my attention.  It’s a purpose built little device that is only $5 on kickstarter.  It’s looks great, it permanent and doesn’t leave any mess on the laptop.  It can also work with most devices including iPads and iPhones.

It’s not on all the time, it has a flick mechanism which enables you to easily flick it open and shut.  When it’s shut over your webcam you can be safe in the knowledge that your webcam is really blocked.

On kickstarter they only aimed to raise $964, but at the time of writing have raised over $84k which puts them 8789% funded!

See the project and check out the video here.

Beginner’s Guide to InfoSec: Peerlyst’s First E-Book on Amazon

The “Beginner’s Guide to Information Security,” crowdsourced from members of the Peerlyst InfoSec community, is now available on Amazon.

The Beginner’s Guide to Information Security offers insight and resources to help readers embark on a career in one of the 21st century’s most important—and potentially lucrative—fields. But even as the world comes to recognize how essential InfoSec is, it’s still a relatively new discipline, and the paths leading into it are many—and not always well defined. The first e-book from Peerlyst (https://www.peerlyst.com), the Beginner’s Guide to Information Security aims to cut through some of the confusion about how and where to start, putting readers on the road to a successful career in the field.

The guide’s content has been crowdsourced from members of the Peerlyst online community of InfoSec professionals. Many are longtime experts in some of the sectors that make up this varied field, others are relative newcomers eager to share the advice and resources they’ve found most valuable during their own career journeys. The contributors include Cheryl Biswas, a cybersecurity consultant focused on threat Intel with KPMG; Kris Rides, who heads an information security recruitment agency; and network security specialist Dean Webb.

Click here for a direct link to the book.



“The Beginner’s Guide to Information Security aligns perfectly with the mission of Peerlyst.com, which is removing information and knowledge barriers so security professionals can work together and educate each other,” says Limor Elbaz, Peerlyst’s founder and CEO. “And if advice from experts helps more newbies get involved in InfoSec, that will ease the pressure on those who are currently in the field—without compromising on the quality of education.”

The Beginner’s Guide to Information Security begins with some chapters that cover ways readers can learn about information security, maybe pick up a certification or two, find out about job opportunities, and then, hopefully, snag a job. Then it delves deeper into the InfoSec field, offering perspective and resources that will help readers master key skills, like knowing how to protect a network, respond to a security incident, and educate users so they’re part of the security solution—not the problem. The last chapters focus on “big picture” issues such as women in security, and where InfoSec may be heading in the future.

The book’s chapters include:

  • Thirteen Steps for Starting Your InfoSec Journey
  • Starting a Career in Network Security
  • How to Prepare for an InfoSec Interview
  • Working with Recruiters
  • How to Get Started in Cryptography
  • How to Secure Your Data
  • Basic Network Security
  • Security Awareness: The “People Part” of Information Systems
  • How to Respond to a Security Incident
  • Women in Security
  • The Defender’s Changing Role

To check out the book on Amazon, go here: http://amzn.to/2aYXfMx. To request a free copy for review, contact us at press@peerlyst.com.

About Peerlyst

Peerlyst is the place where information security pros go to share knowledge and build their professional reputations. With an audience of more than half a million and more than 10,000 posts by security experts, Peerlyst is the preeminent platform for spreading InfoSec news, asking a question, finding an expert, or offering product insight. For more information, emailinfo@peerlyst.com or visit https://www.peerlyst.com.

Media contact:

Mike Stabile
718-501-5181

SOURCE Peerlyst & http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/beginners-guide-to-infosec-peerlysts-first-e-book-on-amazon-300311014.html

Related Links

https://www.peerlyst.com

Answered: Do I need anti-virus software for Windows 10? [Updated for Windows 10 Anniversary Edition]

Updated for Windows 10 Anniversary Edition (12th August 2016)

Back in January of this year we wrote about the anti-virus capabilities of Windows 10 (available to download at this link if you don’t yet have a copy).  Since then Microsoft has released the Windows 10 Anniversary Edition which updates Windows Defender so that:

  1. If you chose to run your own antivirus (such as McAfee for $9.99) then Windows Defender will no longer be disabled.  It will periodically check your PC and also perform all its other security functions.
  2. Windows Defender is tied into the better notification system in Windows 10 so that, if a problem is found, you will be notified immediately.

If you want to read more about Windows Defender’s own capabilities without additional antivirus then carry on reading below…

Original Post (also at this link)

Those that have been Windows users for a long time will be familiar with buying antivirus software. For a long time it has been essential, and potentially considered irresponsible to not use it (you can distribute viruses to others without knowing about it, for example). Apple Mac users used to look on smugly as their Windows using counterparts suffered attack after attack.

Windows users regularly installed software such as Norton, McAfee, Kaspersky etc. However, Windows 10 has is now here and stable. Windows 10 is a free upgrade for most, however if this isn’t the case for you or you are installing it onto a new computer you can buy a copy of Windows 10 Home on a USB stick from Amazon (click here for a direct link). Does it get rid of the need for anti-virus software? No, of course not. There are still plenty of viruses, malware and other nasties kicking around the web. However, Windows 10 comes with a comprehensive set of built in security tools that will more than address your needs. These all come under the umbrella of Windows Defender.

Windows Defender is a robust set of tools that automatically scan your computer for viruses, malware, spyware and more. It does not get in the way of your everyday use of the computer, letting you get on with your tasks at hand, but it does keep running in the background keeping everything secure.


A major point is that, whilst you can have the best antivirus software in the world, if its knowledge of current viruses is out of date then its performance will suffer. It needs up to date definitions to know what to look for, so you have to keep your software update date. This is where Windows 10 with Windows Defender really wins. Windows 10 is now an operating system as a service, which means it is updated in the background without you having to do anything (especially if you are on Windows 10 Home… Pro users have more responsibility to manage updates). New virus definitions are updated along with all the usual Windows updates, which you don’t need to take control of. The upshot is that your system will be as up to date with the latest virus definitions as it can be, without you needing to take any action.

With Windows 10 there is little need for additional security software (unless, of course, you are the type of person who prepares for doomsday) given what Microsoft have made available for free. Of course, you have to trust Microsoft to get it right, but that’s another story. 🙂

Quick! Deals today on networking gear and home network storage

Relevant to our recently published articles on wifi, home networking and backup strategies are today’s deals on Amazon (here).  We’re writing about them today because in our reviews we mention some particular products and if you are quick, you can save some serious money on them.  This brief post is organised around the relevant themes we’ve covered in the past.

Windows 10 Backup (link: How to backup a Windows 10 PC; time machine for Windows)

In this article we discuss backup strategies for Windows 10 using the built in File History software.  We cover off how you can use a USB hard drive, or if you are on a home wifi network you can use a network backup storage.  We recommended the WD My Cloud devices and they are currently discounted:

WD 8TB My Cloud EX2 Network Attached Storage – This is a massive storage device, with 8TB of space to backup even the largest of PCs.  If you get to this deal soon you can save $137 off Amazon’s usual price.  Click here for the deal.

WD 12TB My Cloud Mirror Personal Network Attached Storage – The mirror part of the name is the key with this version of the My Cloud.  This is for the seriously backup conscious as it has two internal hard drives meaning that, if one fails, your data is still stored on the other one.  Click here for the deal.

Home Networking & Wifi (link: Answered: How do I extend the range of my home wifi?)

In this article we discuss the options for extending the range of your home wifi network, coming to the conclusion that a powerline device is the best route in most circumstances.  In the current Amazon deal there are some excellent mark downs, for example, checkout:

D-Link Powerline AV2 2000 Adapter Gigabit Extender Starter Kit – A great powerline starter kit which will extend your wired network across your home power network.  Save $50 today, click here for the deal.

TP-LINK AC1200 Wi-Fi Range Extender – A wifi range extender, with a saving of $50.  Click here for the deal.

There are many more networking related items in the Amazon sale which our readers may find very appealing (be quick, many run out today), so it’s worth checking it out here: Amazon Networking Deals.

Password Managers for Mac: Forget forgetting your passwords

You’re probably reading this post because you’re getting fed up with all those passwords. Maybe you just got locked out of an account because you forgot your password? A new set of super secure applications may be able to help you: password managers.

The leader in this space is 1password and the clue is in the name with these guys, you decide upon one password for the 1password application, then let it do the rest. It integrates with your desktop and browser so that, when you need a new password it’ll generate a super secure one for you, and remember it. Next time you need to login the application will sign you in, just using your 1 master password. You don’t need to remember all the different passwords.

1password say you can use the app, not just for passwords but for keeping your whole online identity safe, including all your personal information, too. In addition to your Mac, 1password is available for Windows, iPhones and Android phones so you’re able to login securely on all your devices. 1password actually communicate their value prop very clearly in this video (plus, we love this guy’s dead pan expression):

You install 1password directly on to your Mac from the AppStore. It does cost a few bucks, but this is worth it when you consider what’s a stake – you need a professional application which is super secure that you can trust. You’ll find it directly on the Mac AppStore here:

In the interests of fairness, there are others out there too (all with apps for most desktop and mobile platforms). Some are free, whilst others are paid for check out:




Answered: Do I need anti-virus software for Windows 10?

Those that have been Windows users for a long time will be familiar with buying antivirus software. For a long time it has been essential, and potentially considered irresponsible to not use it (you can distribute viruses to others without knowing about it, for example). Apple Mac users used to look on smugly as their Windows using counterparts suffered attack after attack.

Windows users regularly installed software such as Norton, McAfee, Kaspersky etc. However, Windows 10 has is now here and stable. Windows 10 is a free upgrade (click here to find out how) for most, however if this isn’t the case for you or you are installing it onto a new computer you can buy a copy of Windows 10 Home on a USB stick from Amazon (click here for a direct link). Does it get rid of the need for anti-virus software? No, of course not. There are still plenty of viruses, malware and other nasties kicking around the web. However, Windows 10 comes with a comprehensive set of built in security tools that will more than address your needs. These all come under the umbrella of Windows Defender.

Windows Defender is a robust set of tools that automatically scan your computer for viruses, malware, spyware and more. It does not get in the way of your everyday use of the computer, letting you get on with your tasks at hand, but it does keep running in the background keeping everything secure.

A major point is that, whilst you can have the best antivirus software in the world, if its knowledge of current viruses is out of date then its performance will suffer. It needs up to date definitions to know what to look for, so you have to keep your software update date. This is where Windows 10 with Windows Defender really wins. Windows 10 is now an operating system as a service, which means it is updated in the background without you having to do anything (especially if you are on Windows 10 Home… Pro users have more responsibility to manage updates). New virus definitions are updated along with all the usual Windows updates, which you don’t need to take control of. The upshot is that your system will be as up to date with the latest virus definitions as it can be, without you needing to take any action.

With Windows 10 there is little need for additional security software (unless, of course, you are the type of person who prepares for doomsday) given what Microsoft have made available for free. Of course, you have to trust Microsoft to get it right, but that’s another story. 🙂